1607 Transplantations to Kerry



On the 3rd May 1601, Sir George Carew, President of Munster, wrote to the Privy Council that Patrick Crosbie had been employed in Her Majesty's service for close to twenty years, and during which time "he had proved himself an honest and faithful subject." In reward for these services he was granted lands in Laois and an extensive territory in North Kerry-lands that had been forfeited by the In the tranquil days of the early-Christian era, Laois was a haven of piety and sanctity, and the silent ruins which today are scattered throughout the county act as gentle, but poignant, reminders of the monastic era which originally shaped our Christian heritage.

The sept or seven-fold system seems to have been a peculiarity of Gaelic civil life interwoven with ecclesiastical divisions and custom. An old common saying was "he (she or it) is the talk of the seven parishes." The 'Seven Laoises' was a loose description of both land divisions and clan/sept divisions and the following names were generally recognised as the Seven Septs of Laois: O'Devoy (O'Deevy), O'Doran, O'Dowling, McEvoy, O'Kelly, O'Lalor and O'Moore.

Fitzmaurices, the Stacks, the MacElligotts and the Cantillons for complicity in the Desmond rebellion. His most important service to the Goverment was the carrying out of the transplantation to Munster of the Seven Septs of Laois. For this purpose he was promised a grant of the district around Tarbert on which to plant close to three hundred members of the leading families of the Seven Laois Septs. In this way the English Government hoped to effect the pacification of Laois which was the scene of continual warfare since planters were first settled there in 1549.

When, on the 17th August 1600, the famous Owny MacRory Óg O'More (O'Moore), Chief of Laois, fell sword in hand, the cause of the Septs was shattered, and, says the Four Masters, "Laois was seized by the English, and they proceeded to repair their mansions of lime and stone, and to settle in the old seats of the race of Conall Cearnach, to whom Laois was the hereditary principality, for there was no heir worthy of it like Owny to defend it against them." Thus it was that the Government thought this would be a good opportunity, before the Septs recovered from their overthrow, to transplant their leading families to Munster or Connaught; for as long as an O'More was in Laois there would be trouble there for the planters.

SurnameGiven NameDate Place Memo
O'Dowlin Donagh McWilliam32492
Agreements between Mr. Crosbie and the Seven Septs of Leise at Mollin O'Lalour upon St. Patrick's Daie, being the seventeenth March 1607. 5. That Mr Crosbie and his heires shall disburden and discharge from them giving of meat drink or clothing to the 288 persons who are not able to live in this paper annexed subscribed by John Mc Mortough and Teig Lalour, but shall kepe them himself or dispose of them as he think good. THE DOWLINS (5) Donell McEdmond O'Dowlin. Donagh McWilliam O'Dowlin. Teig O'Dowlin, and company
1577, Laois, IrelandG, ESTIMATE: 1961 Encyclopædia Britannica suggestes the average life expectancy in early modern England was 35 to 40 years of age.
1607, Laois, IrelandG, Listed as a detainee in the Crosbie Agreement of 1607 involving the Transplantation of the Seven Septs of Laois to Kerry
1617, Laois, IrelandG, ESTIMATE: 1961 Encyclopædia Britannica suggestes the average life expectancy in early modern England was 35 to 40 years of age.
O'Dowlin Donnell McEdmond32491
Agreements between Mr. Crosbie and the Seven Septs of Leise at Mollin O'Lalour upon St. Patrick's Daie, being the seventeenth March 1607. 5. That Mr Crosbie and his heires shall disburden and discharge from them giving of meat drink or clothing to the 288 persons who are not able to live in this paper annexed subscribed by John Mc Mortough and Teig Lalour, but shall kepe them himself or dispose of them as he think good. THE DOWLINS (5) Donell McEdmond O'Dowlin. Donagh McWilliam O'Dowlin. Teig O'Dowlin, and company
1577, Laois, IrelandG, ESTIMATE: 1961 Encyclopædia Britannica suggestes the average life expectancy in early modern England was 35 to 40 years of age.
1607, Laois, IrelandG, Listed as a detainee in the Crosbie Agreement of 1607 involving the Transplantation of the Seven Septs of Laois to Kerry
1617, Laois, IrelandG, ESTIMATE: 1961 Encyclopædia Britannica suggestes the average life expectancy in early modern England was 35 to 40 years of age.
O'Dowlin Teig21771
Agreements between Mr. Crosbie and the Seven Septs of Leise at Mollin O'Lalour upon St. Patrick's Daie, being the seventeenth March 1607. 5. That Mr Crosbie and his heires shall disburden and discharge from them giving of meat drink or clothing to the 288 persons who are not able to live in this paper annexed subscribed by John Mc Mortough and Teig Lalour, but shall kepe them himself or dispose of them as he think good. THE DOWLINS (5) Donell McEdmond O'Dowlin. Donagh McWilliam O'Dowlin. Teig O'Dowlin, and company
1577, Laois, IrelandG, ESTIMATE: 1961 Encyclopædia Britannica suggestes the average life expectancy in early modern England was 35 to 40 years of age.
1607, Laois, IrelandG, Listed as a detainee in the Crosbie Agreement of 1607 involving the Transplantation of the Seven Septs of Laois to Kerry
1617, Laois, IrelandG, ESTIMATE: 1961 Encyclopædia Britannica suggestes the average life expectancy in early modern England was 35 to 40 years of age.
O'Dowling Robert21770
Agreements between Mr. Crosbie and the Seven Septs of Leise at Mollin O'Lalour upon St. Patrick's Daie, being the seventeenth March 1607. 1. That Mr Crosbie shall sweare upon a booke never to revenge upon any of the Septs any anger or controversie that happened between them since the beginning of this matter, and that he shall procure his heire to do the like. 2. That he shall give six ploughlands of Tarbert of that ten ploughland there, to the six persons subscribed and to their heires, they paying him and his heirs six poundes chief rent, with other services and rising oute, and for the rest of the six Septs he shall place them in the Abbey of O'Dorny, Coishcassan, and upon the mountain in his other lands, and shall divide amongst them 11 ploughlands, giving them long leases, and suche freedoms and for such rents, as the L. Bishop of Kerry and John McMurtoughe shall set downe, and they both from tyme to tyme shall end all controversies that shall arise between Mr Crosbie and any of the Septs who shall depart with Mr Crosbie at Midsommer's daie next. 3. That the Septs and their heires for ever shall be faithful, loving and obedient to Mr Crosbie and his heir Piers and their heirs for ever and shal be directed by them in all services of his Maty and all other lawful courses. 4. That Mr Crosbie and his heires shall answer all matters for them as well as Dublin as before the President and in all sessions, they helping to beare his charges and yet every of themselves will appear if need be. 5. That Mr Crosbie and his heires shall disburden and discharge from them giving of meat drink or clothing to the 288 persons who are not able to live in this paper annexed subscribed by John Mc Mortough and Teig Lalour, but shall kepe them himself or dispose of them as he think good. 6. That Mr Crosbie shall give to John McMortough the worth of £400 lands either inheritance or mortgage as the L. Bishop of Kerry and Teig Lalour shall value it. 7. That he and his heire shall maintaine and defend the said Septs and their heires in all lawful causes and shall not suffer them to be wronged or oppressed by any officers or others and that both he and they to be sworne to performe theis articles truly and he to bring his son Piers to the county before Easter Daie to be sworn to performe the same. Signed John McMortough Teig Lalour Robert O'Dowling Mortough McWilliams X marke Donoughe McEboyes X marke Fffarre McGerrott's X marke Patrick O'Doran's X marke
1577, ESTIMATE: 1961 Encyclopædia Britannica suggestes the average life expectancy in early modern England was 35 to 40 years of age.
17 Mar 1607, Ballycarney, Laois, Ireland, Signatory to the Crosbie Agreement of 1607 involving the Transplantation of the Seven Septs of Laois to Kerry
1609, Kerry, IrelandG, ASSUMPTION: that Robert complied with transplantation
1617, ESTIMATE: 1961 Encyclopædia Britannica suggestes the average life expectancy in early modern England was 35 to 40 years of age.